Challenge Coin

The overall shape is that of a badge or shield as it is often referred to.  This is borrowed from the Spartan warriors who used the shield they carried for the protection of those next to them.  This shape was chosen to remind us our badge or shield is for the protection of those we serve.  Under Spartan code to lose or tarnish the shield is the worst thing a warrior could do.

King Demaratus is quoted regarding the harsh punishment Spartan
warriors received if they lost or gave up their shield in battle:

“….because
the latter [other armors] they put on for their own protection, but the shield
is for the common good of the whole line.”

The American Eagle, which displays the colors of our Nations flag
is holding the shield up as a reminder of the warrior’s mission of supporting
the great American experiment, the Constitution of the United States, and all
those who come to this Great Nation.  The
colors of our Nations flag are a reminder of hope; hope of being better, hope
of achieving equality, hope in the great potential we carry, and hope in the
American dream.

The helmet is to protect the warrior, most specifically the
warrior brain.  The most important
feature of the warrior self.

The North Star represents the brain or cognitive part of the
warrior.  We chose the North Star because
throughout history it has been used figuratively and literally to keep us on
track, get back on track, and check our track. 
This is the job of the warrior brain. To borrow from the Gallagher
Westfall Group, are we:

Doing the Right Thing In the Right Way At the Right Time For the Right Reasons

The olive wreath represents the Athenian Philosophy of Victory In
Peace.  We are peace keepers, we maintain
peace and order, peace or lack of crime is our goal.

The quote on the back of the coin:

“The wounds of Honor, Integrity, and Courage are self-inflicted”
is an adaptation of a Carnegie quote to remind the warrior they alone hold the
key to maintaining these three aspects of the warrior code.

With all of these together we have the modern warrior, the one
found in today’s police officer: the Cognitive Warrior A Reader, a Writer, a Thinker, and a Fighter (Gallgher Westfall Group)